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Introduction

Welcome

Welcome to this short course on Manual Handling in Schools.

 

This course will help you to understand how you can reduce the risk of injury from manual handling.

 

We’re going to look at three key areas during the course:

  • Why correct manual handling is important
  • What you lift or move at work
  • How we can avoid injuries and lift items correctly

 

Before we start, it’s helpful to remind ourselves that manual handling means moving a load using human effort, as opposed to mechanical handlings using a crane or lift trucks. It therefore includes lifting, pulling, pushing and carrying.

 

 

There is also a short assessment.

You will need 5/6 to pass.

 

 

This Course has been specifically adapted for:

 

 

Avoiding Injuries

Avoiding injuries

By using the LITE Assessment and assessing the manual handling operation we can reduce the risk of injury by planning our lift or using alternative options.

 

Common School examples

For example, to reduce the risks when manual handling our three common school items:

  • The water cooler could be plumbed into the mains
  • The box of paper could be split and carried as reams or blocks of paper
  • The waste could be moved a shorter distance by bringing the skip or van closer to the building

 

Golfer’s Pickup and Team Lifts

Golfers pick-up

The ‘golfers pick up’ is a useful technique to pick-up and set-down small, light items.

 

As you bend forward raise one leg behind you. This counter-balances your upper-body weight and reduces bending of your lower back.

Team Lift

A team lift may also be helpful if the item is too large or heavy for one person.

 

A team lift works best if:

  • One person is in charge
  • Communication is good
  • People are of equal height, if possible
  • Strong member(s) are at the heaviest end

 

Don’t forget, when assessing your environment, you’ll need to check whether there is enough space to manoeuvre the item.

 

 

 

Lifting Techniques

As well as using the LITE Assessment, if we do need to move an object we also need to think about how we lift, carry and set-down the load.

 

Using the correct techniques means we are less likely to injure ourselves.

Six principles of lifting

There are six principles we should remember when moving a load:

  1. Never attempt a load that is too heavy
  2. Get the load into position before lifting
  3. Use the correct body posture

  1. Don’t twist when lifting
  2. Keep the load close to your body
  3. Keep the load balanced

 

Here is a video to demonstrate good lifting technique.

Avoiding Injuries

Avoiding injuries

By using the LITE Assessment and assessing the manual handling operation we can reduce the risk of injury by planning our lift or using alternative options.

 

Common office examples

For example, to reduce the risks when manual handling our three common office items:

  • The water cooler could be plumbed into the mains
  • The box of paper could be split and carried as reams or blocks of paper
  • The waste could be moved a shorter distance by bringing the skip or van closer to the building

 

Manual Handling Assessments (LITE)

Assessing a manual handling task prior to moving an object is required under the Regulations* and can help reduce the risk of injury.

 

The LITE Assessment is a simple way to remember the factors which should be considered.

 

Click on each    icon below to learn more about the LITE factors.

 

Here is a guide to help determine weight limits for lifting and lowering.

 

*The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002

What you lift at work

Manual handling at work

Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD’s) arising from manual handling affect the muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments and nerves.

 

MSD’s are frequently reported regarding manual handling, whilst upper and lower back injuries are also common.

What do you lift or move?

Have you ever considered what you lift, lower, push, pull or carry at work? It may be a heavy load such as office equipment, or an object you move regularly.

 

Three common office loads are:

  • Replacement bottles for water coolers
  • Boxes of paper
  • Waste

Manual Handling Regulations* aim to reduce the risk of injury and place duties on employers. There are also some principles which we can all use.

 

Download a Guide to Manual Handling here.

 

*The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, as amended in 2002

 

Introduction

Welcome

Welcome to this short course on Manual Handling.

 

This course will help you to understand how you can reduce the risk of injury from manual handling.

 

We’re going to look at three key areas during the course:

  • Why correct manual handling is important
  • What you lift or move at work
  • How we can avoid injuries and lift items correctly

 

Before we start, it’s helpful to remind ourselves that manual handling means moving a load using human effort, as opposed to mechanical handlings using a crane or lift trucks. It therefore includes lifting, pulling, pushing and carrying.

 

 

There is also a short assessment.

You will need 5/6 to pass.

 

 

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